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Counting Rod Numerals

Range: 1D360—1D37F Quantity of characters: 32

Counting rod units

𝍠
U+1D360
𝍡
U+1D361
𝍢
U+1D362
𝍣
U+1D363
𝍤
U+1D364
𝍥
U+1D365
𝍦
U+1D366
𝍧
U+1D367
𝍨
U+1D368
𝍩
U+1D369
𝍪
U+1D36A
𝍫
U+1D36B
𝍬
U+1D36C
𝍭
U+1D36D
𝍮
U+1D36E
𝍯
U+1D36F
𝍰
U+1D370
𝍱
U+1D371

Ideographic tally marks

𝍲
U+1D372
𝍳
U+1D373
𝍴
U+1D374
𝍵
U+1D375
𝍶
U+1D376

Western tally marks

𝍷
U+1D377
𝍸
U+1D378
U+1D379
U+1D37A
U+1D37B
U+1D37C
U+1D37D
U+1D37E
U+1D37F

Counting rods (simplified Chinese: 筹; traditional Chinese: 籌; pinyin: chóu; Japanese: 算木, sangi) are small bars, typically 3–14 cm long, that were used by mathematicians for calculation in ancient China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. They are placed either horizontally or vertically to represent any integer or rational number.

The written forms based on them are called rod numerals. They are a true positional numeral system with digits for 1–9 and a blank for 0, from the Warring states period (circa 475 BCE) to the 16th century.

Unicode: