Currency Symbols 20A0—20CF

  • Number of characters: 48

Currency Symbols is a Unicode block containing characters for representing unique monetary signs. Many currency signs can be found in other unicode blocks, especially when the currency symbol is unique to a country that uses a script not generally used outside that country.

The display of Unicode currency symbols among various typefaces is inconsistent, moreso than other characters in the repertoire. The French franc sign (U+20A3) is typically displayed as a struck-through F, but various versions of Garamond display it as an Fr ligature. The peseta sign (U+20A7), inherited from code page 437, is usually displayed as a Pts ligature, but Roboto displays it as a Pt ligature and Arial Unicode MS displays it as a partially struck-through P. The rupee sign (U+20A8) is usually displayed as an Rs digraph, but Microsoft Sans Serif uses the quantity-neutral «Rp» diagraph instead

A currency symbol is a graphic symbol used as a shorthand for a currency's name, especially in reference to amounts of money. They typically employ the first letter or character of the currency, sometimes with minor changes such as ligatures or overlaid vertical or horizontal bars. Today, ISO 4217 codes are used instead of currency symbols for most official purposes, though currency symbols may be in common use in many other contexts. Few currencies in the world have no shorthand symbol at all. Although many former currency symbols were rendered obsolete by the adoption of the euro, having a new and unique currency symbol – implementation of which requires the adoption of new Unicode and type formats – has now become a status symbol for international currencies. The European Commission considers the global recognition of the euro sign € part of its success. In 2009, India launched a public competition to replace the ₨ ligature it shared with neighboring countries.

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