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Emojis, emoticons and smileys

Here are emoticons for Facebook from symbols and Unicode. You can select, copy, and paste them. There are other symbols for nicknames and Facebook.

☺ ☹ ☻ 😁 😂 😃 😄 😅 😆 😇 😈 😉 😊 😋 😌 😍 😎 😏 😐 😒 😓 😔 😖 😘 😚 😜 😝 😞 😠 😡 😢 😣 😤 😥 😨 😩 😪 😫 😭 😰 😱 😲 😳 😵 😶 😷 😸 😹 😺 😻 😼 😽 😾 😿 🙀 🙅 🙆 🙇 🙈 🙉 🙊 🙋 🙌 🙍 🙎

Old school smileys:
:-D   XD   :P   %*}   :’)   <:0)   >:)   B-)   :-)   <3   :-X   :’-(   :-(   :-/   :-S   =(   =O   !-(   0:-)   :-O   8-|   :-|   |-O   S-)   >:E   >:-(   =|   ~:-(   >;-(‘   (:-&   :-@   :-r   :-*   :-**   ;;)   ;)   :-*)   :-“   :3   :-&   (:-{)   }:-)   :-K

<^O^>   (^.^)/   *^O^*   \,,/(^_^)\,,/   ! d^_^b   \(^O^)/   (/.\)   (-_-)   (>_<)   (-_\\\)   (@_@)   (~.~)   )-0_0-(   (o_O)   (u_u)   (=_=)   *o*   -^o^-   (>^_^)> <(^_^<)   (o)_(o)

ッ   ヅ   ツ   ゾ   シ   ジ   ッ   ツ   シ

͡๏̯͡๏   ͡๏̮͡๏   (̾●̮̮̃̾•̃̾)   (●̮̮̃●̃)   (-̮̮̃-̃)   (-̮̮̃•̃)   †(•̪●)†

(●*∩_∩*●)   (*^ -^*)   (-'_'-)   (¬_¬)   (◡‿◡✿)   (◕‿◕✿)   (✖╭╮✖)   (≧◡≦)   (✿◠‿◠)

(◑‿◐)   (◕‿-)   ✖‿✖   ಠ_ಠ 凸(¬‿¬)凸   ┌∩┐(◣_◢)┌∩┐   (⊙▂⊙)   (≧ω≦)   o(≧o≦)o   (⋋▂⋌)   (•̪●)   (॓_॔)

(╯ಊ╰)   (─‿‿─)   (⊙_◎)   (╯︵╰,)   (。◕‿◕。)   (。❤‿❤。)   (✿ ♥‿♥)   (。♥‿♥。)   (~o❤‿❤~o)

The first use of the smiley dates 1953. It was drawn on the poster of the feature film «Lily». It was a black and white schematic representation of a smiling face. The round yellow smiley was painted by the artist Harvey Ball in 1963. And in 1967 his drawing was used by one of Seattle's universities for an advertising campaign. Later in 1972 the French newspaper France Soir began to mark the positive news with this symbol. At the same time the name “smiley” was fixed for the smiling face — from the English word – “smile”.

They say that emoticons were actively used by hippies. This icon indicated places where you could buy some drugs. Police found out about it quickly, and hippies began to draw smiles anywhere. Of course, it greatly contributed to the spread of smiling faces.

It is not known, if these symbols were used to express emotions until the 20th century. Originally writing was not intended for it. Not many people knew written language. In ancient times people wrote words using icons (pictures). It is possible that they also sketched emotions in some way. Then alphabetic (as well as syllabic and hieroglyphic) writing developed from pictography. And with the invention of computers people began to transmit information with different symbols again.

Vladimir Nabokov is considered to be the first who talked about a special character for a smile. In 1969 in his interview for the New York Times he said that there should have been a typographic mark indicating a smile. The symbol for an emotion is called emoticon. In common language – smiley. It is usually made of several typographic characters, such as a parenthesis or semicolon. Scott Fahlman was the first who proposed in 1982 to use smiley in its present form:

“I propose that the following character sequence for joke markers: :-)

Read it sideways. Actually, it is probably more economical to mark

things that are NOT jokes — given current trends. For this, use :-(“.

As with all other symbols the style of a particular smiley depends on the font you use. In different social networks, operating systems, browsers, the image may differ, despite the fact that the meaning is the same. The letters E and e look different, but mean one thing. Moreover, the character may not appear at all if the font does not support it. Then you may receive a square like this one 𝀨. Here we are talking about Unicode characters, not those smilies for Facebook, Twitter or other social networks where these symbols are pictures.